MODULE #6 (POSITION YOURSELF INSIDE A MOVING STRUCTURE)


Wood, chipboard, metal, vinyl flooring, Raspberry-Pi, LCD-screen,
metal hooks, polyester round sling, video (text based on 3D-Modeling-Software)

Dimensions variable



MODULE #6 (POSITION YOURSELF INSIDE A MOVING STRUCTURE) is a modular stage. It was first constructed in the digital space and afterwards transformed back into the physical exhibition room – following strictly its given structural and institutional conditions. MODULE #6 (POSITION YOURSELF INSIDE A MOVING STRUCTURE) provides a usable playground to the audience, a default structure in which the mobility of objects and the positioning of the audience can be renegotiated – as a result the audience experiences different ideas of spatiality, constantly changing with every new visitor entering the exhibition space.

MODULE #6 (POSITION YOURSELF INSIDE A MOVING STRUCTURE) is a virtually designed stage setting which finds its extension/expansion within the [human] body. Not only is the artwork transforming the audience into acting performers – all interacting objects become active performers within a constructed stage scenario.

Following subtle instructions (displayed on little screens), based on the commands of a 3D visualization software, the audiences’ relationship with the physical and the virtual space starts getting blurred. In MODULE #6 (POSITION YOURSELF INSIDE A MOVING STRUCTURE) the digital language functions as a score, which makes the viewer perform fragmentary movements through its own spatial reflection.








Photography by Ricardo Almeida Roque.


Multilayered motherboards
adopting technologies,
modelling new relationships,
embracing new imaginaries.

Digital technologies as prosthetics
for ideas about form-making.

The computer escaping the box.

Ordinary objects becoming carriers of digital signals,
architecture becoming information.

Performing it
with a repertoire of moves.

Move
Rotate
Scale
Display
Delete
Add
Relations.

Apply an appearance to a face.
Apply an appearance to a feature.
Apply an appearance to a body.
Apply an appearance to an entire part.

Choreographies of human and non-human actors unfolding over time. *



* Based on:
Keller Easterling: An Internet of Things, E-Flux Journal / The Internet Does Not Exist, SternbergPress, 2015
Hito Steyerl: Too Much World:Is the Internet Dead?, E-Flux Journal / The Internet Does Not Exist, SternbergPress, 2015